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Types of Programs

There are many different types of Language Programs. Some program types are more relevant to some Language situations than others so it is important to think about your Language situation when thinking about the type of program that will suit you.

Second Language programs are those where a language is taught to a wide range of learners — in much the same way as non-Indigenous languages are.
Revival programs seek to get community members speaking Language again. There are three types Language revival programs: Language revitalisation projects occur in communities where a language still spoken by the older generation needs special support for it to be transmitted to the younger generations. Language renewal projects draw on a communities oral tradition but can occur in situations where Language speakers do not have full language knowledge. Language reclamation projects can occur in situations where there are no speakers or partial speakers. These programs rely on historical sources to provide knowledge. The NSW Board of Adult and Community Education (BACE)…
Language revitalisation programs one type of Language revival program. They can be conducted where a language is still spoken by the older generation but needs special support for it to be transmitted to the younger generations.
Language renewal programs are a type of Language revival project which can be run in situations where a language is no longer spoken ‘right through’ by anyone, but enough knowledge exists to form a language learning program.
Reclamation programs are revival project which can occur in situations where there has been a complete break in the transmission of the spoken language, but there is sufficient evidence (e.g. historical records, related languages) for language reconstruction and learning. Some revival projects begin with a number of historical documents and recordings, others start with only the fewest resources for example a single word list.
Maintenance programs are those focused on “Keeping Language Strong”. Programs of this type might focus on increasing pride in language and culture and reducing unnecessary pressures that are destructive of language. Generally language maintenance programs are conducted in bilingual communities or those where indigenous languages are the first language. These programs aim to maximising its Language use amongst community members. Language Maintenance programs are those where a language is used daily by a sizeable speech community and so can be incorporated into children’s schooling. Bilingual schools, in which students learn a variety of subjects in their first language (an Aboriginal…
Many languages have been lost and there is an urgent need to record remaining languages. Recording needs to be done in such a way that the language can be subsequently transmitted. It is important that communities have control over the way Language is recorded as well as over the recorded materials. A language recording program may occur for the purposes of archiving the recorded material, or for the material to be used in the production of community resources or education programs. There are many reasons that community members might want to record languages. AIATSIS can provide you with information on…
Awareness programs focus on increasing awareness of the dangers posed to languages, even strong languages. Programs of this type might be directed at the general public, or within our communities where the little bits that are known about a language can be incorporated into other areas (e.g. Society and Environment), but are not enough for sustained language learning).
The language objectives of bilingual/bicultural schools do not just provide a supportive linguistic environment when children first came to school they also build their language skills and develop literacy in each of their languages. In bilingual schools these skills can be built up over a range of subjects and for many hours a day. In contrast language classes in monolingual schools are usually for a short period each week. This can be from 30 minutes to 3 or 4 hours a week. From an Indigenous language teaching/learning perspective these short classes may be adequate for language retrieval work where the…